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Making your staff happy can increase productivity by 12%

Research has shown that there is a strong correlation between personal happiness and productivity in the workplace. Studies have found that people who are happy in their personal lives are 12% more productive in work. This is because happiness and positive emotions have been shown to increase cognitive function, creativity, and motivation, which all contribute to increased productivity.

When employees are happy, they tend to have a more positive outlook on their work, which can lead to greater job satisfaction and engagement. They are more likely to be motivated to complete tasks, and to go above and beyond in their work. Additionally, happy employees are more resilient and better able to cope with stress and challenges, which can help to reduce absenteeism and presenteeism.

Furthermore, happy employees tend to have better relationships with their colleagues, which can lead to improved teamwork and collaboration. This can have a positive impact on the overall culture of the workplace and can improve the communication and problem-solving skills of employees.

It's important to note that as we well know, happiness doesn't only come from the workplace, but more importantly from the personal life of an individual. Employers can support the well-being of their employees by offering flexible working arrangements, promoting a healthy work-life balance, and providing access to resources such as employee assistance programs like Lift Club.


In conclusion, if you invest in helping your staff to become happier in their personal lives, you can help them with their overall well-being AND increase productivity within the workplace. This is because happiness and positive emotions have been shown to increase cognitive function, creativity, and motivation, which all contribute to increased productivity. Employers who invest in the well-being of their employees will see a positive impact on productivity, employee engagement and overall workplace culture.

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